The Law, as written, empowers Judges to protect children from Parental Alienation.

The Law, as written, empowers Judges to protect children from parental alienation.  They have the tools at their disposal to determine the presence of abuse.

The legal profession and the psychological profession are failing to protect children from a foreseeable harm, by ignoring the dynamics of power and control and the presence of Domestic Violence.  The Courts who are responsible for managing the conflict and are beholden on the Psychological professionals and forensic evaluators to understand the conflict.  The law empowers Judges to also obtain information about the conflict through other methods, such as Guardian Ad Litems, Parenting Coordinators, and Court Appointed Special Advocates.

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Rick Scott is a complete retard even for an elected political Hero!

Rick Scott Just Sold Men and Children Out to Protect “Women’s Superiority” in Divorce Court!

– Men’s Views Magazine

Last Friday witnessed the death of one of the most significant pieces of family law legislation to come across his desk in two years. Now fathers and children will have to pay the price for Scott’s fear of the extreme leftist-feminist in his state.

Rick Scott vetoed the combined shared parenting and alimony reform law based on the false pretense that this law would hurt children. According to the Miami Herald,

He said he was troubled by a provision in the bill (SB 668) that would require judges to begin divorce proceedings with a premise that both parents are entitled to approximately equal time with their children. Scott said that would put “the wants of a parent before the child’s best interest by creating a premise of equal time-sharing,” a decision that he said should be left to judges.

Anyone who has taken even one child development course knows the best environment for children is with his or her mother and father playing significant daily roles. Many studies report that children fair much better when children spend equal time with both parents.

The real reason why Gov. Scott vetoed the bill had everything to do with money. Divorced mothers would be loosing a great deal of child support with the new shared custody structure.

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Forced Parental Alienation

A Story of Forced Parental Alienation | The Glass House Girls

Fighting for my Children

Counting The Days… 989, the number of days as of 29th March 2016 since I spent the day with my children. I say ‘day’ because I was graciously allowed by my ex to see them for one hour in 2014, which was the last time I saw them. Prior to that it was an afternoon in July 2013.

The thirteenth of February 2005 at 01:04am and the thirtieth of July 2010 at 09:58am, are two of the proudest moments of my life thus far and the birth dates of my two children, Benjamin and Abigail (or Abigirl as she will always be known to me after her then five year old brother mispronounced her name at birth!).aabad-momstandingintheway

I don’t really remember the presents I bought them, the expensive holidays, the theme parks or material things. I remember bedtime stories and bath times. I recall the feeling of comforting my children when they were poorly. That immense and over-exaggerated sense of pride when they took their first single steps and spoke their first words. Those moments mean more than any amount of money we spent on holidays or plastic toys. They are moments you can’t take back or replicate.

I was there for all those memories; they are imprinted on my mind like videos. I have to cling on to those memories, those videos in my mind – because four and half years ago my marriage broke down (not completely out of the blue, we had been having issues for quite some time) and I am now a part of society that is overlooked by an antiquated family law system; one that is based on prehistoric thinking and no real legal support for those who need it most.

Family Law Reform Rally - 2016

I am, what some choose to call, an ‘absent father’.

A Grossly Inadequate System

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Gov. Rick Scott vetoes alimony bill, cites potential harm to children | Miami Herald

is-florida-s-governor-scott-making-alimony-reform-political-again1In vetoing family law bill, governor emphasizes child-custody sharing clause and putting needs of children first

Thousands of people submitted comments on both sides of divorce reform…here’s one of our favorite comments

R. Michael Brown originally shared to Guys With Kids (Important Discussion):

Florida Gov. Rick Scott and supporters of vetoing the alimony bill presume that women are better parents than men – across the board.

Ask the police, ask the jail/prison guards, and ask me – we’ve all witnesses and testified about unfit mothers that are on drugs; live by violence, dishonesty, and/or stealing; or plunk their kids in front of TV and video games 24 hours a day and the fathers are good men that don’t do any of the above – yet the men are denied at least 50% custody.

The presumption that women are better at parenting just because of their gender in the year 2016 is delusional.

Yeah – children first Governor Scott.

The judges and family court system is so corrupt and don’t give a flip about what really goes on in a household so they can’t possible know what’s in the best interest of a child.

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Making children the winners in custody cases

Making children the winners in custody cases – The Washington Post

In her Oct. 11 letter, “Maryland courts put parents’ rights ahead of children’s safety,” Eileen King criticized Maryland’s newly established Commission on Child Custody Decision Making as a vehicle for emphasizing parents’ rights and joint custody. I wish to explain that joint custody is primarily for the children, not the parents.

Children love and need both parents. During marriage, there is automatic joint custody of all children.

Why should divorce erase a parent from a child’s life?Do what is right

Why should a family have to spend large sums of money on a potentially ruinous custody battle when those funds could go to benefit the child?

Why should one parent be reduced to spending only a few days a month with a child, if he or she is ready, willing and able to be a capable parent?

The children suffer the most in such arrangements because, as many child experts point out, children benefit from bonding with two parents.

There is no statutory joint custody in Maryland. And no judge would willingly give sole custody or joint custody to an abusive or neglectful parent.

In the current sole-custody climate, there are often charges and counter-charges, and judges must determine which parent will be the “winner” in a custody battle.

If the commission can help utilize joint custody, mediation, parent education, collaborative law and expedited handling of custody complaints, while respecting children’s rights, it will have done a great service to the children of Maryland.

David L. Levy, Hyattsville

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Divorced Co-Parenting Oxymoron

The Big Lie About Co-Parenting

Divorce is shrouded in terminology that doesn’t begin to describe the intricacies of the relationships affected. It comes down to this: co-parenting or shared-custody is a full-time commitment. It requires just as much negotiating as a married couple engage in. Why would a couple who divorced due to irreconcilable differences be able to co-parent well?

It’s no wonder that often co-parenting is just a clever joining of words without substance. It comes down to who is caring for children the majority of the time — whomever the equation is weighted toward, is in charge. And within that paradigm there is little room for co-anything. And divorced? Forget about it. You are married without the health insurance.

05691-knowtheindustry2521

You are never divorced if children are involved. You are perpetually divorcing. If the spoils amount to a cat and a Kitchen Aid bought with hoarded 20 percent discount cards from Macy’s by your former mother-in-law, being fully divorced is possible.

This past weekend, negotiating the ends and outs of parenting teenagers, I had to admit, I’m not divorced. It won’t be a done deal until I’m pronounced dead. Time of death, 3:10 a.m. Time of divorcED, 3:11 a.m.

I’m just as married as any other aging former Girl Scout leader littering the hair salons of my small town. We are all covering our gray hair now. We are all stepping through the parenting minefields that are the teenage years. The difference between me and the ladies wearing out-of-style 1990s yellow gold wedding band sets? They may still have health insurance through their spouse, and possibly through the years their spouse has morphed into a good friend. Or, they might live inside stony silence and tolerate their spouse.

It is difficult enough with two parents living under the same roof to parent peacefully. It may be impossible when living under two different roofs. Different roofs, with a backdrop of unfinished business, anger, dislike for the other person and a sense of failure — failure for not having been able to paint the back drop a vibrant orange, for not having been able to find a way to get along, for failing to stay under the same roof.

An enlightened few have figured out how to be peaceful living beneath different roofs. Maybe they had good manners to begin with. Maybe they had a preternatural clarity of mind and an ability to transcend the pain accompanying divorce. I am not one of the shiny few.

I was not able to seamlessly move forward. Along with my less than graceful transformation from married to divorcing, I took a “divorce parenting” class required by the state of Massachusetts.

In the mandated class I learned obvious things: Don’t badmouth your former spouse to your children. Don’t ask your children about your former spouse’s private life. Don’t make your children chose who they like to be with more, you or your former spouse. Be kind to your children. Your children will forever be in shock from the selfish and disruptive decision to divorce made by you and your former spouse (that part I added. But something like that was inferred).

The class had the least amount of sexual energy I had ever felt in a room of mixed genders. Our wicks had been snuffed. We were zombie-like. The teacher was hopeful for us all. He assured us that we would go forth and still have healthy children. That we would indeed recover.

That was (hard to believe) six years ago. It was the spring. My mini van in the parking lot after class was the only thing I recognized inside my new life. The class met for four weeks on consecutive Wednesday evenings. After class, we the wickless wonders would file past lilacs heavy and fat, hanging from well-groomed trees. Each of us had failed at something we had cared enough about to make legal. The lilacs in bloom seemed insulting.

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