“The Change is Long Overdue” ~ Florida Senate Bill 250 for Equal Shared Parenting is now law.

Permanent alimony, defined formulas are key points in new legislation

By Paul Giorgio – Producer

Justice Denied - No Jury in Family Courts - 2016

MELBOURNE, Fla. – Major changes could be coming to Florida’s alimony law.

Alan Frisher, co-founder of The Family Law Reform advocacy group, said the change is long overdue.

“I think our laws are really archaic,” he said. “We haven’t changed our laws for the last 50 years in essence and now it’s time to really make the change.”

Frisher said there are five key points to the proposed law. In addition to the removal of permanent alimony and the ability to modify or eliminate alimony at retirement, the bill also defines a formula judges must use when determining settlements.

“We want to be able to give judges discretion, but we don’t want to give them so much discretion that there’s no consistency from one sector to another, because right now there’s no predictability or consistency,” Frisher said.

Currently if someone paying alimony remarries, the courts can view the new spouse’s income as ‘family income’ that is eligible for an upward modification in payment.

Under the current law, modification is also possible if a payer earns a greater yearly salary. Payers cannot be brought back to court under the new bill.

A similar bill was vetoed in 2013 by Gov. Rick Scott. That bill had language that would have allowed it to apply retroactively. Scott said it would have unanticipated results. HB 943 has eliminated that language.

Source: New bill could mean big changes for alimony in Florida

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Sole custody is harmful to children

Children in joint custody arrangements had less behavior and emotional problems, had higher self-esteem, better family relations and school performance than children in sole custody arrangements. And these children were as well-adjusted as intact family children on the same measures, said Bauserman, "probably because joint custody provides the child with an opportunity to have ongoing contact with both parents."  These findings indicate that children do not actually need to be in a joint physical custody to show better adjustment but just need to spend substantial time with both parents, especially with their fathers, said Bauserman. Also, joint custody couples reported less conflict, possibly because both parents could participate in their children's lives equally and not spend the time arguing over childcare decisions. Unfortunately a perception exists that joint custody is more harmful because it exposes children to ongoing parental conflict. In fact, the studies in this review found that sole-custody parents reported higher levels of conflict.  It is important to recognize that the results do not support joint custody in all situations. When one parent is abusive or neglectful or has a serious mental or physical health problem, sole-custody with the other parent would clearly be preferable,

Children in joint custody arrangements had less behavior and emotional problems, had higher self-esteem, better family relations and school performance than children in sole custody arrangements. And these children were as well-adjusted as intact family children on the same measures, said Bauserman, “probably because joint custody provides the child with an opportunity to have ongoing contact with both parents.”
These findings indicate that children do not actually need to be in a joint physical custody to show better adjustment but just need to spend substantial time with both parents, especially with their fathers, said Bauserman. Also, joint custody couples reported less conflict, possibly because both parents could participate in their children’s lives equally and not spend the time arguing over childcare decisions. Unfortunately a perception exists that joint custody is more harmful because it exposes children to ongoing parental conflict. In fact, the studies in this review found that sole-custody parents reported higher levels of conflict. It is important to recognize that the results do not support joint custody in all situations. When one parent is abusive or neglectful or has a serious mental or physical health problem, sole-custody with the other parent would clearly be preferable,

Why are shared care arrangements good for children? Why must the courts address parental alienation? Why is leave to remove invariably not in a child’s best interests? Why are overnights not harmful for very young children? Why is the traditional model of alternate weekend contact arrangements insufficient as a post separation child arrangements model?

The answers are in a wide body of research which should (but does not) form the basis of policy on post-separation child arrangements. If it did, shared parenting arrangements would be the norm.

Shared Parenting Research

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I Just Want To Be A Good Dad

shared parenting· Supporters of South Dakota Shared Parenting  link ·

A group of fathers in New Jersey have banded together to bring a class action lawsuit against five family court judges. They allege their constitutional rights…
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Siding with Democratic legislators, Florida Governor Rick Scott (R) vetoed alimony reform legislation that Florida’s GOP-controlled legislature had passed by a
EXAMINER.COM
Please meet… Chris Colbert Regional Director (Southeast) Chris is the proud father of a son and a daughter. Chris worked hard to achieve 50-50 legal and physical custody of his children. He is a fifth grade teacher in the State of Florida and in his spare time he enjoys golfing, grilling, and outdoor activities. Chris graduated from Union College with a BA in History. He continued his education at the National University of Ireland, Galway and has an MA in Irish Studies. He became actively involved with The Fathers’ Rights Movement while battling for his children in 2014-2015. In June 2015, Chris became an editor for the Florida Chapter’s Facebook page. A few months later, he was promoted to Central page and then was asked to be a member of the Board of Directors. He now uses his energies to help other parents have an equal say in raising their children. Chris is currently the Regional Director for the Southeast. He wants every father out there to know that, “You are not alone.”

My daughter is now 9 and despite a long court case, nothing much has changed.

My ex has hurt me for years on end and she seems relentless in erasing me from our daughter’s life. I am reduced to nothing more than a brokenhearted dad that battles on for justice in the courts.

Will someone make or encourage my ex to let me see our daughter, to see me as an equal parent, and let me be a part of our daughter’s life? I have a lot to give and a lot to teach her, but the only people she gets to see is her mothers’ friends and family. Not a true representation of her whole family!

SUPPORT OUR CAUSE ~ Children’s RightsThe Harm Caused By Family Court System - 2016

Not all dads are good fathers. What about the deadbeats?

What about them? You want an acknowledgement that they in fact exist?

Of course they do. So do bad mothers. Abusive ones. Neglectful ones. Their existence however doesn’t disadvantage mothers as a whole walking into a courtroom.

Do you think that as The Fathers’ Rights Movement–a movement for fathers fighting for their children–we should jump on the “screw dads” bandwagon like all of the politicians, media, and the countless mom groups out there talking about how bad dad is, how inferior the paternal instinct allegedly is to the maternal instinct?

”Bad dads” are thrown in our face everywhere else on the internet and in society. We tell the other side of that story–the one that virtually never gets heard. Why do people get all up in arms because we focus on dads who are fighting for their children?

Can we not have one place where we don’t have the fact that bad dads exist thrown in our face?

We get it.

It’s not like we’re not aware that some dads are deadbeats.

We do however know these to be the minority compared to fathers who are good fathers and want to be fathers. We do question, in most of the instances where a father is being accused of being a deadbeat, whether or not he actually is or was never allowed the chance. Fathers not being treated equally is a much more serious and prevalent problem than fathers who willingly walk away when they were given a fair chance.

A true deadbeat would not likely even bother to join a movement such as this. He’s not fighting to see his kids. He has nothing to offer this movement, and we have nothing to offer him.

TFRM is for fathers fighting for equal consideration in their children’s best interest, and all fathers deserve to at least be considered an equal unless they prove or reveal themselves to be otherwise.

That is the purpose of this movement.

–Derek

This man is spot on. Parental Alienation is a mental health problem caused by the alienating parent that goes back to THEIR childhood. I always thought this was the case. Not helped of cause by Cafcass not even recognizing that it exists. Dr Childress has studied this for seven years. The courts can sort it once the mental health systems recognize it and not the other way around. A great eye opener.

Children's and Fathers Rights - Battling Parental Alienation in the UK & Beyond

My daughter is now 9 and despite a long court case, nothing much has changed. For 12 days every fortnight I am a hard-working, broken-hearted person and I cannot find anything in the UK to make me happy.

For the two days every fortnight that I get to spend with my daughter, I am a happy, proud and confident person, a total contrast to my days without her.

Yesterday I gazed out the window watching fireworks and was really missing my angel but I cannot call her, she doesn’t call me and knowing she is only a mile away hurts like hell.

My ex has hurt me for years on end and she seems relentless in erasing me from our daughter’s life and I am reduced to nothing more than a broken-hearted dad that battles on for justice in the courts, so that someone will make my ex encourage our…

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