Sole custody is harmful to children

Children in joint custody arrangements had less behavior and emotional problems, had higher self-esteem, better family relations and school performance than children in sole custody arrangements. And these children were as well-adjusted as intact family children on the same measures, said Bauserman, "probably because joint custody provides the child with an opportunity to have ongoing contact with both parents."  These findings indicate that children do not actually need to be in a joint physical custody to show better adjustment but just need to spend substantial time with both parents, especially with their fathers, said Bauserman. Also, joint custody couples reported less conflict, possibly because both parents could participate in their children's lives equally and not spend the time arguing over childcare decisions. Unfortunately a perception exists that joint custody is more harmful because it exposes children to ongoing parental conflict. In fact, the studies in this review found that sole-custody parents reported higher levels of conflict.  It is important to recognize that the results do not support joint custody in all situations. When one parent is abusive or neglectful or has a serious mental or physical health problem, sole-custody with the other parent would clearly be preferable,

Children in joint custody arrangements had less behavior and emotional problems, had higher self-esteem, better family relations and school performance than children in sole custody arrangements. And these children were as well-adjusted as intact family children on the same measures, said Bauserman, “probably because joint custody provides the child with an opportunity to have ongoing contact with both parents.”
These findings indicate that children do not actually need to be in a joint physical custody to show better adjustment but just need to spend substantial time with both parents, especially with their fathers, said Bauserman. Also, joint custody couples reported less conflict, possibly because both parents could participate in their children’s lives equally and not spend the time arguing over childcare decisions. Unfortunately a perception exists that joint custody is more harmful because it exposes children to ongoing parental conflict. In fact, the studies in this review found that sole-custody parents reported higher levels of conflict. It is important to recognize that the results do not support joint custody in all situations. When one parent is abusive or neglectful or has a serious mental or physical health problem, sole-custody with the other parent would clearly be preferable,

Why are shared care arrangements good for children? Why must the courts address parental alienation? Why is leave to remove invariably not in a child’s best interests? Why are overnights not harmful for very young children? Why is the traditional model of alternate weekend contact arrangements insufficient as a post separation child arrangements model?

The answers are in a wide body of research which should (but does not) form the basis of policy on post-separation child arrangements. If it did, shared parenting arrangements would be the norm.

Shared Parenting Research

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News Media Investigates ‘fraud’ in Family Court

‘Fraud’ in NJ Family Court
Calls resound to reform family law and stop legal abuse.

No One Is Above The Law - 2016

PIX11 Investigates: Calls resound to reform ‘fraud‘ NJ family court

“Family Court in New Jersey in our opinion is fraud and racketeering,” said Greg Roberts, founder of the Family Civil Liberties Union. “I call it the greatest fraud every perpetrated on the American public.”

Roberts said the family court system tears families apart. While lawyers lob verbal grenades at both sides and collect money, the family is the casualty laying in the wake.

“They treat families like criminals,” Roberts said. “Once you get into the family court system, you cannot get out of the family court system until your earnings and your savings are decimated.”

The documentary “Divorce Corp” estimates divorce to be a 50-billion dollar a year industry. With little oversight, lawyers are incentivized to keep their clients in court to make as much money as possible.

“When you have money, when you have assets, and when you have big income these big firms have absolutely positively no interest in resolving your case, even if you want to,” lawyer John W. Thatcher said in recordings obtained exclusively by PIX11.

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VoteFamily-US -- 2015