The Right Questions To Be Asking In Family Law

A. Do child custody proceedings and family laws violate substantive due process rights of fit parents, as contrary to the United States Supreme Court Jurisprudence that state courts are not to enter the family realm without a compelling interest?
B. Does a child have a reciprocal substantive right to the care, custody, and companionship of his or her parent, reciprocal to that of the child’s parents?
C. Does the current Family Court climate deliberately and systematically violate the civil and constitutional rights of families?
D. Are parents second-class citizens?
E. Is there a nobility in this country?
F. Do Family Courts across America engage in conducting a cottage industry as a RICO Enterprise?
G. Are Family Courts operating a “Kids for Cash” scheme to sell parents’ own children back to them?
H. Has the domestic relations exception of Federal Court created a “black hole” of injustice?
I. Do Family Courts operate as quasi-criminal courts and as such, shouldn’t families be entitled to the same procedural protections as criminal courts?
J. Do Family Courts across America deliberately and systematically usurp the Constitution of the United States of America?
K. Do Family Courts across America deliberately and systematically usurp federal case law such as that of Troxel v. Granville, Santosky v. Kramer, and Griswold v. Connecticut?
L. Are these acts not seditious? Treason?
M. Would it not be better to abolish the Family Courts altogether as they seem to serve no other purpose than to terrorize families pursuant to 18 USC § 2331?
N. Should families negotiate with these terrorists contrary to public policy?
O. Has society changed in a way that requires a change in legal principles?

FRE 501 permits federal judges to announce evidentiary privileges that are not codified, but that should be recognized in view of changes in societal values.
AmericanFathers LiberationArmyhttp://www.change.org/p/u-s-house-of-representatives-u-s-senate-president-of-the-united-states-abolish-the-tyranny-of-state-family-courts-and-enact-federal-legislation-that-provides-strong-procedural-protections-to-families-and-makes-child-sexual-abuse-a-federal-crime-in-th/u/9396366  

Parental Rights Causes - 2015

It’s hard to sue a judge – Judges are generally immune from suit for actions they take in court.

I am a survivor of child abuse. I was abused in all ways from birth. No part of my life is pre trauma. I was abused by parents, extended family and people outside my family including nuns and priests who also brainwashed me to promote their agenda. Besides the physical, verbal and emotional abuse when I was 6 my mother sexually abused me at a time when I was already being sexually abused by a neighbour girl. My experience teaches me that Federal and State courts be they Civil, Criminal or Family betray abused children and adult survivors of child abuse. The courts do not allow me a forum to seek justice from my abusers in Civil or Criminal courts.

The interests of children should be of paramount importance, but have given way to an abomination of a cottage industry exploiting children for profit and bankrupting the American public. It affects all of us because our civil and constitutional rights as a whole are being destroyed and we are becoming a Police State, if we’re not one already. It is happening in family courts across America, the implications of which are pivotal to the future of this country.

Family Court has become an atrocity and it is unthinkable, yet an absurd fact that it is self-policing. Put best by the Roman poet Juvenal, “Sed quis custodiet ipsos custodes?” (Satire VI, lines 347–8) or in English, “Who will guard the guards themselves?”

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The Important Family Law Questions

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Family legal cases can move real quick once they begin and a lot of parents going through family court for divorce, custody or visitation can quickly find themselves in quick sand up to their neck. In any family legal situation, it’s important to know the basics of what to expect and what you can do to enforce your parental rights in the court room and at home when the dust finally settles. A lot of people have never gone to court before and don’t really know what to do and are not familiar with all the terms and types of custody that are loosely thrown around in these kinds of legal matters. Whether you have an attorney or not, although having one is more expensive it is slightly easier to get the information and assistance you need, asking the right questions and taking the…

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5 thoughts on “The Right Questions To Be Asking In Family Law

  1. WE LOVE THIS BLOG!
    http://georgiafathersrights.blogspot.com/
    When it’s time to divorce, put your children first – really.
    On behalf of Edwards & Associates posted in Custody on Wednesday, January 18, 2012

    You’ve probably heard it before: the reminder that when it comes to divorce, it’s important to consider your children. Most people claim to want what’s best for their kids, and in their hearts, they do. But in practice, particularly during divorce proceedings, this can be frustratingly difficult.

    Child custody is just one of the details you and your soon-to-be ex need to work out as you prepare for your new lives apart. Although the days when custody was automatically awarded to the mother are long behind us, mothers are still more likely to be granted primary custody, and fathers often fail to stand up for their rights.

    It’s important to keep in mind that unless either of you has shown to be an unfit parent, children greatly benefit in the long term from having relatively equal time with both parents. Too often custody is used as a tool to exact revenge on a spouse, and while it may initially feel good for the parent awarded custody to hold that judgment over the other parent’s head, in the end, it’s your child who suffers most, not your spouse. At the same time, remember to stick up for yourself before assuming you won’t get as much time with the kids as your ex.

    Accompanying the issue of custody is child support. In the state of Georgia, child support is usually calculated using the incomes of both parents along with the amount of time their children spend with each. But what if custody didn’t enter the equation, and the amount of money each parent had to work with was settled without that tug of war? If custody and support were determined separately, there might be less fighting over both.

    Speaking of fighting, many parents believe that they’re effectively hiding their emotions about the divorce from their children. But keep in mind how perceptive kids can be without talking directly to them. They hear you on the phone, in the next room, complaining to your friends or to yourself about your ex. Divorce almost always has a long-term negative effect on children. Your job as their parent at this time is to lessen that negativity in whatever way possible. That means both you and your ex need to treat each other as respectfully as you can, and to truly put your child’s feelings ahead of your own.

    The end of your marriage doesn’t have to spell the end of good times for anyone — you, your spouse or your children. But you as a parent are responsible for ensuring that the details of your divorce, whether it’s time (child custody) or money (child support), don’t get in the way of a happy childhood for your son or daughter.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Children’s Bill of Rights

    WHEN PARENTS ARE NOT TOGETHER

    Every kid has rights, particularly when mom and dad are splitting up. Below are some things parents shouldn’t forget — and kids shouldn’t let them — when the family is in the midst of a break-up.

    You have the right to love both your parents. You also have the right to be loved by both of them. That means you shouldn’t feel guilty about wanting to see your dad or your mom at any time. It’s important for you to have both parents in your life, particularly during difficult times such as a break-up of your parents.

    You do not have to choose one parent over the other. If you have an opinion about which parent you want to live with, let it be known. But nobody can force you to make that choice. If your parents can’t work it out, a judge may make the decision for them.

    You’re entitled to all the feelings you’re having. Don’t be embarrassed by what you’re feeling. It is scary when your parents break up, and you’re allowed to be scared. Or angry. Or sad. Or whatever.

    You have the right to be in a safe environment. This means that nobody is allowed to put you in danger, either physically or emotionally. If one of your parents is hurting you, tell someone — either your other parent or a trusted adult like a teacher.

    You don’t belong in the middle of your parents’ break-up. Sometimes your parents may get so caught up in their own problems that they forget that you’re just a kid, and that you can’t handle their adult worries. If they start putting you in the middle of their dispute, remind them that it’s their fight, not yours.

    Grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins are still part of your life. Even if you’re living with one parent, you can still see relatives on your other parent’s side. You’ll always be a part of their lives, even if your parents aren’t together anymore.

    You have the right to be a child. Kids shouldn’t worry about adult problems. Concentrate on your school work, your friends, activities, etc. Your mom and dad just need your love. They can handle the rest.

    IT IS NOT YOUR FAULT AND DON’T BLAME YOURSELF.

    —-Special Concerns of Children Committee, March, 1998

    “Children’s Bill of Rights” is a publication of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. © 1997 – 2001. All rights reserved. “Children’s Bill of Rights” may be reproduced under the following conditions:

    It must be reproduced in its entirety with no additions or deletions, including the AAML copyright notice. It must be distributed free of charge. The AAML reserves the right to limit or deny the right of reproduction in its sole discretion.

    © 2013 AAML Florida. 3046 Hawks Glen Tallahassee, FL 32312 | 850-668-0614

    The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask the attorney to send you free written information about their qualifications and experience. The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for individual advice regarding your own situation.
    http://www.aamlflorida.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.tentips

    Liked by 3 people

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